how to keep elderly cool in hot weather

With temperatures rocketing across the country, it’s important to check in on your elderly loved ones or someone you think might be vulnerable. According to the NHS, the over 75s and people living with mobility problems are particularly at risk as being dehydrated can lead to feeling faint which can lead to dizziness and falls. It’s also vital for older adults to stay hydrated as it is important for some medications to work properly and often the hot weather makes you lose your appetite.

10 tips to help keep your elderly loved ones cool during the hot weather

  1. Ensure they drink at least 6 – 8 glasses of liquid a day and even more when temperatures soar
  2. Avoid all caffeine and alcohol. If they resist drinking, make some fruit smoothies or milkshakes
  3. Stay indoors with the curtains closed and ensure the windows are open to catch any breeze
  4. If you live close by, offer to drive an ollder person to an air-conditioned place, or just take a ride in an air conditioned car
  5. Ensure they are wearing loose lightweight clothing made from cotton as it’s much cooler than synthetic fabric
  6. Keep a cool wet flannel handy and place it on the back of their neck
  7. Eat some ice lollies (top tip: you can catch the drips with a cupcake liner), or eat some cooling snacks like slightly frozen grapes
  8. Eat light, cold meals like chicken or pasta salad and include more fruit and vegetables which are high in water content such as watermelon, strawberries, oranges, peaches, blackberries or cucumbers, lettuce and celery
  9. Sponge them with cool water or help them have a cool bath or shower
  10. Place their feet in a pan of cool (but not too cold) water.

What are the common signs of overheating?

It’s essential that you know the most common signs to look out for as overheating can affect elderly people very quickly. These include:

  • Fainting
  • Breathlessness
  • Dizziness
  • Chest pain
  • Weakness
  • Muscle cramps
  • Changes in their behaviour – confusion, being agitated or acting strangely
  • Body temperature over 104°F (40°C)
  • A rapid pulse or a slow, weak pulse

Looking for help at home?

If you or an elderly loved one you require help during the hot weather, then our home carers can help check in on your elderly relatives or even provide live-in care. Discover how our home care agency can help you or a loved one today, please email us or call our care team for an informal chat on: 0800 138 4030.